Hurricane Tracking

 

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Tropical Weather Outlook


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Tropical Outlook for Wilma

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Tropical Outlook for Stan (Discontinued)


 

Latest Satellite Imagery

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Atlantic Gulf

 

2003 Storm Names

Atlantic Names

Atlantic

Ana
Bill
Claudette
Danny
Erika
Fabian
Grace
Henri
Isabelle
Juan
Kate
Larry
Mindy
Nicholas
Odette
Peter
Rose
Sam
Teresa
Victor
Wanda

E. Pacific

Andres
Blanca
Carlos
Delores
Enrique
Felicia
Guillermo
Hilda
Ignacio
Jimena
Kevin
Linda
Marty
Nora
Olaf
Patricia
Rick
Sandra
Terry
Vivian
Waldo
Xena
York
Zelda

2004
Alex
Bonnie
Charley
Danielle
Earl
Frances
Gaston
Hermine
Ivan
Jeanne
Karl
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter

 

2005
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Dennis
Emily
Franklin
Gert-
(
CHÈRT)
Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katrina
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rita
Stan
Tammy
Vince
Wilma

 
2006
Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William
2007
Andrea
Barry
Chantal
Dean
Erin
Felix
Gabrielle
Humberto
Ingrid
Jerry
Karen
Lorenzo
Melissa
Noel
Olga
Pablo
Rebekah
Sebastien
Tanya
Van
Wendy
2008 Arthur
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gustav
Hanna
Ike
Josephine
Kyle
Lili*
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paloma
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred

 

2009
Ana
Bill
Claudette
Danny
Erika
Fabian
Grace
Henri
Isabel
Juan
Kate
Larry
Mindy
Nicholas
Odette
Peter
Rose
Sam
Teresa
Victor
Wanda
Other Years

Frequently Asked Questions
related to Tropical Weather

Question When is the official hurricane season?

Answer The hurricane season in the Atlantic Basin, which includes the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, runs from June 1 to November 30 each year. In the eastern Pacific, the season begins on May 15 and ends November 30. Of course, hurricanes and tropical storms can and do form outside these time periods, albeit rarely.

 

Question How are hurricanes named?

Answer Atlantic tropical systems are named from lists maintained and updated by an international committee of the World Meteorological Organization. Six lists are used in rotation. Thus, the 1999 list of names will be used again in 2005. At the beginning of each season, the first storm is always the A storm no matter how many storms formed in the previous season. A seperate set of six name lists is used for Eastern Pacific storms. For storms that form elsewhere in the Pacific Ocean, around Australia and Papua New Guuinea, or in the Indian Ocean, names are used sequentially. In other words, if the last storm of the 1999 season was the M storm, the first storm of the 2000 season will have a name beginning with N. When the bottom of one list is reached, the next name is taken from the top of the next list.The only time that the name lists are changed is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity. To see the various name lists for the world's tropical systems and to learn more about the retirement of hurricane names, please see the National Hurricane Center's page on the topic at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutnames.html.

 

Question How are tropical storms & hurricanes categorized in terms of strength?

Answer When a tropical system first begins to organize, it is initially called a tropical depression. Once sustained wind speeds reach 39 mph, the system is upgraded to a tropical storm and given a name. If a tropical storm intensifies to the point where sustained winds reach 74 mph or greater, it is classified as a hurricane. The strength of a hurricane is categorized by the Saffir-Simpson scale. There are five categories on the scale which are used to estimate the storms potential for property damage and flooding were it to make landfall. Details about the Saffir-Simpson scale can be found at http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutsshs.html.

 

Question Where can I find out more about tropical storms and hurricanes?

Answer Answers to an abundant collection of Frequently Asked Questions are available on the National Hurricane Center's web site. The information is available in both English and Spanish.

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